Chickpea regrets

June 1, 2010

Well I’m not perfect. I learned that much yesterday.  I planned a progressive dinner in my neighborhood (we have a course at each neighbor’s home), and so wanted to do appetizers so I could make hummus, but I should have planned to make another dish, like pesto or salsa because hummus is just a little too imperfect on its own.  I did make two different kinds of hummus- peanut butter and regular, but I just don’t think it was enough.  Plus I’m going to culinary school and need to do a bit more to impress the locals!  But it’s all well.  My hummus was received approvingly and my Mom even thought up our grape leaves and sugar snap peas to eat it with.  Better luck next time…

P.S. My experimental hummus was made with peanut butter instead of tahini.  People liked it, but I think I’m addicted to the spicy variety.  Maybe next time I make it I’ll add spices.  Also, I need to make black bean hummus one of these days because I had some at whole foods last week and it was really spicy and good!

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6 Responses to “Chickpea regrets”

  1. Geraldine Says:

    Hi fellow hummus lover! Earlier this year I went through a stage of eating hummus every day of the week, slathered all over pitta or carrots (or my fingers). Recently it’s been hard to get my hands on a halfway decent pot of the stuff, and although I’ve had a few goes at making my own, I can never get it quite right! Help! Your peanut butter hummus sounds good to me. My personal fave is spicy red pepper hummus. Nom nom.

    • hummusgirl Says:

      Hi Geraldine, that’s cool that you’ve made your own. I make my own because the store brand is so expensive and I’m poor. Mine used to be too thick and pasty but I learned to add chickpea liquid and olive oil to make it smoother (and tastier)! The peanut butter hummus was pretty good, although I missed the tahini. Happy hummus hunger pains!

    • Houston Says:

      Dad always prnecuoond it as homos with along o sound rather than a u sound. I assumed the u sound was Greek.Sort of like baklava was prnecuoond bak la’ a wa with a long a in the middle an a like a short u and a w at the end.Do you know if these pronunciations are regional or if people just follow the Greek because it is better known?

      • hummusgirl Says:

        Hi Houston, thanks for the info about Greeks having influence on food sounds. I really don’t know too much about language in terms of what influenced what. I do know when I read about growing plants in humus (as in soil) I got confused and thought the farmers were speaking in other Mediterranean tongues! Thanks for reading! Joan (aka hummusgirl)


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